Sector News

  1. Perceived Risk of Opioid Overdose

    Background

    Globally, opioid use is on the rise. Opioid dependence is estimated as the largest contributor to the global burden of disease from drug dependence. In the United Stated, over 25 million people began using nonmedical opioids between 2002 and 2011. During this time, the drug-poisoning mortality rate more than doubled.

    Method

    The authors surveyed 172 opioid users in San Francisco to assess predictors of risk perception for opioid overdose.

    Findings

    • Older individuals and those who injected more frequently were less likely to see themselves at a high risk for opioid overdose. However, the literature indicates that those who are older are actually more likely to die from overdose.
    • Those who injected more frequently were less likely to perceive themselves as high risk for overdose.
    • Interestingly, although concurrent use of opioids and alcohol was associated with a high-perceived risk of overdose, concurrent use of opioids and benzodiazepines or cocaine was not. Yet previous research shows that concurrent use of these substances is linked to opioid overdose.
    • Participants who experienced a past overdose, used heroin and mixed opioids and alcohol more frequently were more likely to see themselves as high risk for overdose. This finding is consistent with the literature, which shows previous overdose to be the strongest predictor of overdose and overdose death.
    • HCV positive participants were more likely perceive themselves at high risk for overdose. However this association was not found amongst HIV positive participants, despite the risks. This suggests a gap in risk perception amongst this particular population.

    Conclusion

    There are gaps in awareness between real overdose risk factors and perceived overdose risk amongst opioid users. The authors highlight the need for educational interventions.

    Rowena, C., Santos, G.M., Behar, E., and Coffin P.O. (2016). Correlates of overdose risk perception among illicit opioid users. Drug and Alcohol Dependence. 159: 234-239.