Sector News

  1. US Cities with Needle Syringe Programs Have Fewer Publically Discarded Needles than Cities without NSPs.

    Opponents of NSPs often claim that the injection supplies provided by NSPs will be discarded unsafely in public spaces. This US based study wanted to see if this was in fact true. The study compared San Francisco, where distribution sites are legal, and Miami, where distribution sites are illegal. Findings strongly suggest the opposite is true.

    The study showed:
    • San Francisco had 11 publically discarded needles during the study period, while Miami had 328
    • 11% of San Francisco interviewees reported having discarded syringes in public space in previous 30 days, compared to 69% in Miami
    • 65% of San Francisco interviewees reported having discarded syringes unsafely in previous 30 days, compared to 95% in Miami
    • The primary safe method of disposal were discarding needle/syringes at Needle Syringe Site (62% of interviewees from San Francisco, 0% from Miami)
    • In San Francisco 8,474 out of 64,259 syringes (13%) were reportedly disposed of unsafely, of which 718 (1%) were discarded in a public space. In Miami, 9845 out of 10,379 (95%) of syringes were reportedly disposed of unsafely, of which 4689 (45%) were discarded in a public space
    • Injection drug users in Miami were 34 times more likely to discard syringes in public spaces than those in San Francisco.
    Conclusion: Needle Syringe Distribution programs are a significant means of collecting used supplies and do not increase the amount of publically disposed syringes.

    For more information – click here

  2. Safer Injection Pamphlet – NOW AVAILABLE!

    The OHRDP launched a new Safer Injection Pamphlet at the 2014 Harm Reduction Conference. Thank you to everyone from across the province of Ontario who provided feedback and input on this new resources! Hard copies can be ordered from info@ohrdp.ca at no cost. We would like to extend a special thank you to Vancouver Coastal Health for sharing their original work with us.

    View Pamphlet Here

  3. Best Practice Recommendations for Canadian Harm Reduction Programs

    Drug use practices that can lead to transmission of HIV, HCV, and other infections are pressing issues affecting communities throughout Canada. To stay current with emerging evidence and ensure that people have access to high-quality services that help prevent HIV and HCV transmission, best practice recommendations must undergo review and update. A Canada-wide team of researchers, service providers, policy makers and people with lived experience have developed, through extensive literature review and synthesis, an updated and comprehensive set of best practice recommendations: Best Practice Recommendations for Canadian Harm Reduction Programs that Provide Service to People Who Use Drugs and are at Risk for HIV, HCV, and Other Harms.

    The document has new and improved best practice recommendations about needle and syringe distribution, other injection equipment distribution, handling and disposal of used drug-use equipment, and safer drug-use education. In addition, lots of new material can be found on safer crack cocaine smoking equipment distribution and opioid overdose prevention (education and naloxone distribution). Below are links to the full set of recommendations, individual recommendations for equipment, disposal and education, and informative one-pager summaries of the recommendations and evidence!

    Together, these chapters form Part 1 of updated best practice recommendations for harm reduction programs across Canada. Part 2 is under development and should be released next year.

    More Resources on the CATIE website – English

    More Resources on the CATIE website – French